Educational Datamining in Australia, part III

I think I have almost recovered from my jetlag and it is time to publish the final part of this travel trilogy.

After visiting Melbourne, I arrived in Adelaide just for time to see the jacarandas bloom. This is in front of the university and the whole city was full of these beautiful blooming trees. The second spring for me for the year 2015. :)

After visiting Melbourne, I arrived in Adelaide just for time to see the jacarandas bloom. This is in front of Adelaide University and the whole city was full of these beautiful blooming trees. The second spring for me for the year 2015. 🙂

Considering these circumstances, it was hard to stay inside for work but I managed to get my SPSS started and finally got into the analysis phase of my research. So I had interesting data from Helsinki University programming course and the coolest script that preprocessed this data into a format in which it is possible to look at the students’ development over time. What else do you need but a couple of statistically significant differences and then draw some conclusions about them?

Well, we did find interesting and statistically significant differences between the students who returned exercise solutions through out the course and the students who stopped returning solutions. I almost already wrote down conclusions about how we could identify the students who dropped out and maybe interfere the situation before it is too late etc. But when messing around with the data I also got to understand it better and better and figured out that all of the students who stopped handing in assignments had actually not dropped out. Good for the students! But what about my conclusions?

I think, I will next travel to Helsinki University and get a new version of the dataset with some additional information. Luckily I already have a cool script for preprocessing the data and some other scripts to do the analysis in SPSS and I even drew the conclusions already. 😉 So I just need to re-do the analysis before I rush into the conclusions part… 🙂 Umm… Hey, wait a minute…

So here we have a photo that I will name "a hard nut to crack". (This is in Kangaroo Island.)

So here we have a photo that I will name “a hard nut to crack”. (This is in Kangaroo Island.)

My colleague Claudia had done some cool interrior designing: posters introducing all the CS heroes that can be hang in the walls of the department to teach the students a glimpse of history!

My colleague Claudia in Adelaide University had done some cool interrior designing: posters introducing all the CS heroes that can be hang in the walls of the department to teach the students a glimpse of history! Did you ever recognize how many awesome ladies there are in the history of CS?

My suitcase was already too full at this point of the trip but I could still fit in a memorystick with all of these fab posters stored in it. So now it’s just a matter of time when we get the Australian souvenirs printed in BIG size and hang on the walls of our department! Suggestions on where they should be placed? And I also have the poster template so just send me a picture of your hero and the text and I’ll print a poster to be hang next to your office door. 🙂

And the mandatory touristic photo...

And the mandatory touristic photo. This is taken in the Adelaide hills.

It was a wonderful experience to really have time to dive into research for a change inbetween teaching duties. A great thank you for TUT Foundation for this possibility! I learned a lot about educational datamining and hope to be able to apply my knowledge both in teaching development and in research!

And the researh is still on-going… Next year there should be a new blog post about a research article written with cool co-authors from Australia and Helsinki!

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One Response to Educational Datamining in Australia, part III

  1. Pingback: Educational Datamining in Australia, part II | TUT Pervasive Computing Blog

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