Journal Publication about a New Method for Dead Reckoning

A new article, MEMS IMU Carouseling for Ground Vehicles, was published in IEEE Transactions on Vehicular Technology, Vol. 64, No 6. The idea for this originated from rate table + gyro system we used for detecting if Earth is really rotating.

Earth rate measuring set up from Iozan, L., M. Kirkko-Jaakkola, J. Collin, J. Takala, and C. Rusu (2012) "Using a MEMS gyroscope to measure the Earth's rotation for gyrocompassing applications", Measurement Science and Technology, 23 025005 (8 pp), Institute of Physics Publishing

Earth rate measuring set up from Iozan, L., M. Kirkko-Jaakkola, J. Collin, J. Takala, and C. Rusu (2012) “Using a MEMS gyroscope to measure the Earth’s rotation for gyrocompassing applications”, Measurement Science and Technology, 23 025005 (8 pp), Institute of Physics Publishing

We found out that Earth is indeed rotating, but the measurement system was a bit complex. A motor with controlled rotation sequences was needed to get rid of gyro biases. So, I turned the original (vertical) rotation axis to horizontal and figured out that the system in that orientation looks a bit like vehicle wheel. Which rotates for ‘free’ when driving. Some new equations were needed so that the system thinks its rotation is controlled, and as a side-effect the system also measures the distance traveled. The result is relative positioning (dead reckoning) system with accurate heading.

As publication process feels sometimes a bit slow *), I made some social media teasers along the process.

When the measurement system is in wheel, it experiences a bit wild motion:

But the method fixes the rotation so that observations make more sense:

Path that system on a wheel travels when the car turns 360, using Wolfram Language’s tweet a program:

*) even the JuFo rank dropped from 3 to 2 during the process, hopefully not due to this article 😉

Text by: Jussi Collin

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